Enough is enough; there is ample time for politics

 

Adal Isaw

adalisaw@yahoo.com

October 24, 2009

 

The millions of our people who are the victims of poverty should not in any way be the subject of anything else but help.  Our people need our instantaneous help and they are not at luxury to hear about the contentious views we harbor on the nature of poverty, hunger and development.  Our contentious views are merely competing plans in quest for sustainable development—to rid our people from many years of abject poverty and cannot be tendered at this moment in time to buy a loaf of bread.

 

Today, our responsibility to our people who are suffering from lack of food can only be expressed by the instantaneous act of giving.  Our giving may not have great bearing to what we think the future should hold for our people, but nevertheless, it will help them live another day—with hope for future lasting solution to come sooner— via an arduous collective work of Ethiopians.    

 

For our people in need of an immediate help, their future is today and they need not to hear an argument, debate and name-calling over tomorrow’s lasting plan.  Their numbing predicament is simply an issue of today that we all Ethiopians can ameliorate together in spite of our political and ideological differences.  This may be is a wishful thinking drawn from the verge of naivety—a daydream that many of us Ethiopians dwell on when struck by news that we wish was a tale of the past.  But I dare to think otherwise; sooner or later and politics aside, the Ethiopian Diaspora will stand together not by conviction to support or reject a contentious view or a party but by sudden sense of responsibility owed to a deserving people. 

 

Peer pressure will shade its cover; anger will subside; tears will flow; hearts will break harder than during a loss of a friend; and in each and every Ethiopian Diaspora household, the need to do something different that makes us do the same will emerge.  The predicament of our people will ironically brings us together and the hope of us Ethiopians arduously working together in spite of our political and ideological difference will come sooner than it was ever hoped.  Why should we as a people dwell on issues that matter less rather than work together to lend a hand to a deserving people of ours in such testing time?  Why? 

 

Few may not swallow this call for a common purpose to dispense our responsibility as Ethiopians to stand on the side of our people.  Few may rather choose the side for which they have a pledge of allegiance and may continue to create new frontiers of frenzies over what could, would and should have been done by the government.  The frenzies may continue un-muffled to the point of hindering the very effort needed to ameliorate the suffering of our people.  This time though, this particular Ethiopian Diaspora with such a plan in its political playbook will stand alone.  Its ardent supporters of women and men will “draw the line on the sand” to tell it— “enough is enough; there is ample time for politics.”