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THE CLIMATE CHANGE DISASTER

 

THE CLIMATE CHANGE DISASTER

Yohannes Gebrsellasie (Ph.d) Addis Ababa

11-16-19

More often than not, I tried to reiterate the importance and more importantly, the impact of climate change to my readers and collogue. Some replied with the same concern while others were skeptical about the issue in question. The Global climate impact on human as well as animal lives goes without saying. Some colleagues try to downplay the climate issue and tell me that I have to raise more important issues according to their priorities of course; issues such as poverty, desertification, migration,   peace and security etc. My answer to my dear readers and colleagues is simple, clear and net. All those issues they raise are important but they are directly linked and firmly intertwined with the impact of climate change, In fact, all their concerns can be solved if humanity is more concerned and joins hands to solve the global climate crisis and at least be able to minimize the carbon emission causing havoc and destruction to our earth. The climate issue is not an individual, group, community, political party and even a government or non-government organization’s and/or association’s issue. It is definitely an issue rather a very important issue of the entire global community at large.

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 The climate issue Is the issue of the Global planet. It concerns every one of us, all of us as human beings who care not only for the wellbeing of our generation bur indeed for our next generation as well. We as people survive because of it so do the animal species. We all depend on it for our survival. So do our animal species.  Extinction of climate means extinction of human as well as animal species, as simple as that and as scary as that. Therefore, my answer to my dear readers is also as simple and as clear as that. So what is happening to this important issue in question? Here is my take. Our future lives on Earth. Our Earth is currently suffering because of climate change and many of us do not even understand that or we are simply complacence about it.  The weather is getting from bad to worse from time to time; the floods are destroying roads, construction sites, buildings, residential areas, bridges etc. It is even taking human as well as animal lives in an unpredictable and unprecedented ways and means. The ice bergs are melting and animal species are disappearing from our planet. The scale of the tribulation we as human being face is unparalleled.  It is way much worse than we think and what we imagine. It is unimaginable to think what the not nearly distance enough future probably holds for us. Our future forecast is simply doom. Dying oceans, unbeatable air and plagues of warming are enough to induce an honest to God panic attack.  This  is a warning to some of us who even think we are already terrified to the future to be strongly complacence about the scientific proof.

We now that climate change will raise  sea level rises of between four to eight feet before the end of this century,; but then again what is a few feet if you happen to live a couple of  miles inland? That so many feel already acclaimed to the prospect of  a near future  world with dramatically higher oceans come to accept the inevitably of extended nuclear war because that is the scale of devastation the rising ocean will bring. It is worse than we think. If our anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, we are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today. Rising oceans are bad, in fact very bad; but fleeing the coastline will not be enough. Indeed, absent a significant adjustment to how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth will likely become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable as soon as the end of this century. Even when we train our eyes on climate change, we are unable to comprehend its scope. This past winter, a string of days 60 and 70 degrees warmer than normal baked the North Pole, melting the permafrost that encased Norway’s Svalbard seed vault a global food bank nicknamed Doomsday, designed to ensure that our agriculture survives any catastrophe, and which appeared to have been flooded by climate change less than ten years after being built.

Until recently, permafrost was not a major concern of climate scientists, because, as the name suggests, it was soil that stayed permanently frozen. But Arctic permafrost contains 1.8 trillion tons of carbon, more than twice as much as is currently suspended in the Earth’s atmosphere. When it thaws and is released, that carbon may evaporate as methane, which is 34 times as powerful a greenhouse-gas warming blanket as carbon dioxide when judged on the timescale of a century; when judged on the timescale of two decades, it is 86 times as powerful. In other words, we have, trapped in Arctic permafrost, twice as much carbon as is currently wrecking the atmosphere of the planet, all of it scheduled to be released at a date that keeps getting moved up, partially in the form of a gas that multiplies its warming power 86 times over. But no matter how well-informed we are, we are surely not alarmed enough. Over the past decades, our culture has gone apocalyptic perhaps the collective result of displaced climate anxiety, and yet when it comes to contemplating real-world warming dangers, we suffer from an incredible failure of imagination. The reasons for that are many: the timid language of scientific probabilities, which the climatologist James Hansen once called “scientific reticence” in a paper chastising scientists for editing their own observations so conscientiously that they failed to communicate how dire the threat really was; the fact that the country is dominated by a group of technocrats who believe any problem can be solved and an opposing culture that doesn’t even see warming as a problem worth addressing;  This has made scientists even more cautious in offering speculative warnings; the simple speed of change and, also, its slowness, such that we are only seeing effects now of warming from decades past  uncertainty .The  way we assume climate change will hit hardest elsewhere, not everywhere; the smallness (two degrees) and largeness (1.8 trillion tons) and abstractness (400 parts per million) of the numbers; the discomfort of considering a problem that is very difficult, if not impossible, to solve; the altogether incomprehensible scale of that problem, which amounts to the prospect of our own annihilation; simple fear. But aversion arising from fear is a form of denial, too!

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